Changes in monkeypox vaccine policy, putting the second dose on hold

Citing a “severely limited” supply of the two-dose monkeypox vaccine, Massachusetts health officials are instructing providers to stop scheduling appointments to administer the second dose. Starting Monday, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health is telling vaccine partners to prioritize the first doses for as many eligible people as possible. In a statement, the department said preexisting second-dose appointments would be honored, but new second-dose appointments would not be scheduled until more doses are available. “This approach is intended to provide the broadest possible protection against the spread of monkeypox virus in Massachusetts and is consistent with a growing number of states, jurisdictions, and large municipalities,” the officials wrote in a statement. Massachusetts reported the first case of monkeypox virus infection in the country on May 18. Since then, DPH has reported 157 cases in the state and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported more than 7,000 cases nationwide. The federal government declared a public health emergency Thursday to bolster the response to the monkeypox outbreak. State health officials say nearly 5,875 doses of the Jynneos vaccine have been administered in Massachusetts. Statewide, 14 providers are administering the vaccine, which is available to people at higher risk of exposure to someone with the infection. The list of health care provider sites is available on the state monkeypox vaccine website. early cases were associated with international travel, recent cases were not. “Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men make up a large proportion of the cases identified to date,” the DPH said in a news release. “However, the risk is not limited to the LGBT community, and anyone who has been in close contact with someone who has monkeypox is at risk.” Early symptoms of monkeypox may include fever, headache, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes, but a rash may be the first symptom. Rash lesions start out flat, become raised, fill with clear fluid (vesicles), and then turn into pustules (pus-filled). A person with monkeypox may have many lesions or only a few. Although the virus does not spread easily between people, people can spread the infection once they develop symptoms. Transmission occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids and monkeypox sores, by touching items that have been contaminated with fluids or sores (clothing, bedding, etc.), or, less frequently, through respiratory droplets after prolonged face-to-face contact. If you think you may have monkeypox, you should isolate yourself, but if you need to leave your home, you should wear a mask and cover any rashes or sores when you are around other people. Those who live with or care for someone who may have monkeypox should wear a disposable mask and gloves. gloves if they need to come into direct contact with the lesions and when handling any clothing or bedding if the person is unable to do so themselves. They should also wash their hands regularly, especially after contact with the infected person or their clothing, sheets, towels, and other items or surfaces they have touched.

Citing a “severely limited” supply of the two-dose monkeypox vaccine, Massachusetts health officials are instructing providers to stop scheduling appointments to administer the second dose.

Starting Monday, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health is telling vaccine partners to prioritize the first doses for as many eligible people as possible. In a statement, the department said preexisting second-dose appointments would be honored, but new second-dose appointments would not be scheduled until more doses are available.

“This approach is intended to provide the broadest possible protection against the spread of monkeypox virus in Massachusetts and is consistent with a growing number of states, jurisdictions, and large municipalities,” the officials wrote in a statement. statement.

Massachusetts reported the first case of monkeypox virus infection in the nation on May 18. Since then, DPH has reported 157 cases in the state and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have reported more than 7,000 cases nationwide.

The federal government declared a public health emergency Thursday to bolster the response to the monkeypox outbreak.

State health officials say nearly 5,875 doses of the Jynneos vaccine have been administered in Massachusetts. Statewide, 14 providers administer the vaccine, which is available to people at higher risk of exposure to someone with the infection.

The list of health care provider sites is available on the state website. monkeypox vaccine website.

The DPH said that while many of the early cases were associated with international travel, recent cases are not.

“Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men make up a large proportion of the cases identified to date,” the DPH said in a news release. “However, the risk is not limited to the LGBT community, and anyone who has been in close contact with someone who has monkeypox is at risk.”

Early symptoms of monkeypox may include fever, headache, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes, but the first symptom may be a rash. Rash lesions start out flat, become raised, fill with clear fluid (vesicles), and then turn into pustules (pus-filled). A person with monkeypox may have many lesions or only a few.

Although the virus does not spread easily between people, people can spread the infection once they develop symptoms. Transmission occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids and monkeypox sores, by touching items that have been contaminated with fluids or sores (clothing, bedding, etc.), or less commonly, through respiratory droplets after of prolonged face-to-face contact.

Anyone who thinks they may have monkeypox should self-isolate, but if you need to leave your home, you should wear a mask and cover your rash or lesions when around other people.

Those who live with or care for someone who may have monkeypox should wear a disposable mask and gloves if they need to have direct contact with lesions and when handling clothing or bedding if the person is unable to do so for themselves. They should also wash their hands regularly, especially after contact with the infected person or their clothing, sheets, towels, and other items or surfaces they have touched.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.